KeagenHadley-what-happens-if-your-knee-is-bone-on-bone

Introduction

Your knee is one of the most complex joints in your body. It is made up of bones, cartilage, ligaments, and tendons. All of these components work together to allow you to move your leg in every possible direction. If any of these components are not working correctly, it can cause pain and discomfort.

In this blog post, we will discuss what happens if your knee is bone on bone. We will also discuss some treatment options that are available to you.

Knee Joint

The knee joint is a hinge joint that allows the leg to move in a forward and backward motion. The joint is formed by the articulation of the femur (thigh bone) and the tibia (shin bone). These bones are connected by ligaments, which provide stability to the joint.

The knee also has cartilage, which is a type of tissue that cushions the bones and allows them to move smoothly against each other. The knee cartilage increases joint space and is what prevents the knee joint from being bone-on-bone. Synovial fluid is also present in the knee joint. This fluid lubricates the joint and helps to reduce friction.

Purpose of Knee Joint

The knee joint is responsible for a lot of movement. It is a shock absorber that allows us to walk, run, jump, and change directions quickly. The knee also helps to bear the weight of the body. All of this movement and weight-bearing can put a lot of stress on the knee joint.

What is Bone on Bone?

When the articular cartilage between the bones wears down, it can cause the bones to rub against each other. This is what is known as bone on bone. Bone on bone can happen for a number of reasons. It can be caused by arthritis, an injury, or even wear and tear from everyday activities. When the cartilage wears down, it can cause the bones to rub against each other, which can lead to pain and discomfort.

Causes of Bone on Bone.

Bone on bone is a condition that can occur when the cartilage in the knee joint wears down. This can happen for a number of reasons, including:

Osteoarthritis: This is the most common cause of bone on bone. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease that causes the breakdown of cartilage. This can happen due to age, wear and tear, or injury. Osteoarthritis of the knee is common.

Rheumatoid arthritis: This is an inflammatory joint disease that can cause the cartilage to break down.

Injury: A traumatic injury to the knee can damage the knee cartilage and lead to the bone-on-bone situation described above.

When the cartilage breaks down, it can no longer cushion the bones. This can cause the bones to rub against each other, which leads to pain and stiffness. Bone on bone can also make it difficult to move the knee joint.

Symptoms of Bone on Bone

The most common symptom of bone on bone is joint pain. This pain can range from a dull ache to a sharp, shooting pain. The pain may be worse with activity or when the knee is under stress. Other symptoms of bone on bone include:

-Swelling and inflammation

-Stiffness and loss of range of motion

-Grinding or crunching sensations

-Weakness

-Instability

What Happens if Your Knee is Bone on Bone?

If you have bone on bone in your knee, it is important to seek treatment. If untreated, bone on bone can lead to further damage to the joint and may even require surgery. There are a number of treatment options available for those with bone on bone in their knee.

Treatment Options

There are a number of different treatment options available for bone on bone in the knee. These options include:

Weight loss: Losing weight can help reduce the amount of stress on the knee joint. This can help to relieve pain and improve the range of motion. This can be done by changing your diet to include more whole foods and also increasing your energy expenditure through workouts.

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Exercise: Exercise can help to strengthen the muscles around the knee joint. This can help to take some of the pressure off of the knee and reduce pain.

Medications: There are a number of different medications that can be used to treat bone on bone on bone in the knee. Anti-inflammatory medications are helpful for pain relief with knee arthritis, knee osteoarthritis, or other causes. These can be prescription or over-the-counter medications.

Injections: There are a number of different injections that can be used to treat bone on bone in the knee. These include corticosteroid injections and hyaluronic acid injections.

Surgery: In some cases, knee surgery may be necessary to treat bone on bone in the knee. This includes joint replacement surgery or osteotomy.

Physical Examination

Your doctor will begin by asking you about your symptoms and medical history. They will then do a physical examination of the knee joint. During the exam, they will check for swelling, tenderness, and range of motion. They will determine if you have a healthy knee, if there is pain from the soft tissue or muscles around the knee, or if there is pain coming from the knee joint itself. This is done with different diagnostic tests.

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Physical Therapy

Physical therapy is one of the non-surgical treatments that are available. It can be a helpful treatment option for those with bone on bone in the knee. Physical therapy can help to improve the range of motion and strengthen the muscles around the knee joint. This can help to take some of the pressure off of the knee and reduce pain. A physical therapist can help you find the treatment plan that is best for you.

Knee Braces

Another treatment option for bone on bone in the knee is to use a knee brace. Knee braces can help to take the pressure off of the knee joint and relieve pain. There are a number of different types of knee braces available. Your doctor can help you choose the right one for you.

What Doctor Should I See?

If you think you may have bone on bone in your knee, it is important to see a doctor. Your primary care doctor can evaluate your symptoms and order tests, such as an x-ray, CT scan, or MRI, to confirm the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, they can work with you to develop a treatment plan that is right for you. You may also be referred to either orthopedic surgeons or rheumatologists for further evaluation and treatment.

Types of Surgeries for Bone on Bone

There are a number of different surgeries that can be used to treat bone on bone in the knee. These include:

Joint replacement surgery: This is a surgery where the damaged knee joint is replaced with an artificial joint.

Osteotomy: This is a surgery where the bones around the knee are cut and realigned. This can help to take pressure off of the damaged joint and relieve pain.

Arthrodesis: This is a surgery where the knee joint is fused together. This can help to reduce pain and improve stability.

Total knee replacement surgery: This is a surgery where the entire knee joint is replaced with an artificial joint.

No matter what type of surgery you have, it is important to follow your doctor’s instructions for recovery. This will help to ensure that your knee heals properly and that you do not experience any complications.

Return to Daily Activities

After you have received treatment for bone on bone in the knee, you will be able to return to your everyday activities. However, it is important to listen to your body and not push yourself too hard. If you experience any pain, swelling, or other symptoms, be sure to contact your doctor. They can help you determine if you need to adjust your activity level or make any other changes.

Conclusion

If you have bone on bone in the knee, there are a number of treatment options available. These include injections, physical therapy, knee braces, and surgery. Your doctor can help you choose the right treatment for you. With proper treatment, you will be able to return to your everyday activities.

Do you have any questions or concerns about what happens if your knee is bone on bone? Leave a comment below and let us know. We’re here to help!

About the Author

Hi there! I’m Dr. Keagen Hadley, OTD, OTR/L. Straight out of the University of Mary, I’m all about blending my know-how in knee health, well-being, and medical technology. As a licensed occupational therapy doc, I’m here to translate complex concepts into clear, actionable insights – whether it’s knee care or groundbreaking healthcare tech.

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