KeagenHadley-can-a-sprained-ankle-cause-knee-pain

Introduction

It’s not uncommon for people to experience knee pain after they’ve sprained their ankle. Many people wonder if there is a connection between the two injuries. Can a sprained ankle cause knee pain? The answer is yes; it’s not uncommon for the two injuries to occur together.

In this blog post, we will discuss the connection between ankle and knee pain, as well as some of the treatment options available.

Ankle Joint

The ankle joint is a complex structure made up of bones, ligaments, and tendons. This joint is what allows us to move our feet up and down. The ankle bones in the joint are held together by ligaments, which are strong bands of tissue that provide stability. The tendons attach the muscles to the bones and help us to move our joints.

The ankle joint is susceptible to injury because it bears a lot of weight. When we walk, run, or jump, the force of our body weight goes through the ankle joint. This can put a lot of stress on the bones, ligaments, and tendons in the ankle joint. If this stress is too much, it can cause the joint to become injured.

Two Major Ankle Injuries

Two most common injuries to the ankle can occur: a sprained ankle and a fractured ankle.

A sprained ankle occurs when the ligaments in the ankle joint are stretched or torn. This can happen if you roll your ankle, twist it, or land on it wrong. A sprained ankle is usually painful and can make it difficult to walk.

A fractured ankle occurs when one or more of the bones in the ankle joint are broken. This broken bone can happen if you fall and land on your ankle, or if you twist your ankle in a way that puts too much stress on the bone. A broken ankle is also usually painful and can make it difficult to walk.

A common type of fracture is stress fracture. This type of fracture occurs when the bone is repeatedly put under stress, such as from running.

Types of Sprains

There are three types of sprains:

Grade I: A mild sprain. The ligaments are stretched, but not torn.

Grade II: A moderate sprain. The ligaments are partially torn.

Grade III: A severe sprain. The ligaments are completely torn.

A different type of sprain is the high ankle sprain. These more severe sprains occur above the ankle joint, near the lower end of the shin bone. Because these high ankle sprains are more serious than other types of sprains, they can take longer to heal.

Ankle Ligaments

Several ligaments help make up the ankle joint. What ligament is injured in a sprained ankle?

Calcaneofibular: is an outside ankle ligament and is commonly sprained when an ankle is rolled. It is the only ligament on the outside of the ankle that is commonly injured.

Anterior talofibular ligament: is the most commonly injured ligament during an ankle sprain and is located on the inside of the ankle. It can be stretched or torn when you roll your ankle inward.

Posterior talofibular ligament: is located on the back outside part of the ankle and can be sprained when you roll your ankle outward.

In addition to these ligaments, two other ankle ligaments can be injured: the deltoid and the spring. The deltoid is located on the inside of the ankle and can be torn with an inward roll. The spring is located on the outside of the ankle and can be sprained with an outward roll.

The Achilles tendon is on the back side of the ankle and is not generally injured during an ankle sprain.

KeagenHadley-white-shoes-showing-ankles

How Do You Get a Sprain?

You can get a sprain by rolling your ankle, twisting it, or landing on it wrong. This can happen when you’re walking, running, or jumping. Sprains can also occur during contact sports or other activities.

Symptoms of a Sprain

The symptoms of a sprain can vary depending on the severity of the injury. Grade I and II sprains usually cause pain, swelling, and bruising. Grade III sprains will cause more severe pain and can also cause joint instability and deformity.

High ankle sprains can cause all of these symptoms, plus difficulty walking.

Who to See for a Sprain?

If you think you have a sprained ankle, it’s important to see a doctor. Your doctor or another healthcare provider can determine the severity of your injury after a physical exam and recommend treatment.

Orthopedic surgeons are doctors who specialize in bones, joints, and muscles. They can provide you with a comprehensive evaluation and create a treatment plan to help you recover from your injury.

Diagnosis of a Sprain

Your doctor can usually diagnose a sprain based on your symptoms and a physical examination. They may also order an X-ray, CT scan, or other imaging tests to rule out other injuries.

Prevention of Sprains

There are several things you can do to prevent sprains. First, warm up before you participate in any activities. This will help loosen your muscles and prepare your joints for the activity.

Second, wear supportive shoes that fit well.

Third, avoid walking or running on uneven surfaces.

Fourth, don’t participate in activities that are too strenuous for your fitness level. Finally, don’t try to do too much too quickly – build up your activity level gradually.

Treatment Plan for Sprains

The treatment for a sprain depends on the severity of the injury. Grade I and II sprains can be treated with rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). Grade III sprains may require surgery to repair the ligaments.

High ankle sprains can also be treated with RICE but may require special exercises or a splint or cast. Proper treatment can help you return from your ankle injury to your everyday activities.

Physical Therapy for Sprains

After you’ve been treated for a sprained ankle, you may need to participate in physical therapy. Physical therapy can help you regain range of motion and strength, and can also help prevent future injuries. Your doctor or another healthcare provider can refer you to a physical therapist.

Surgery for Sprains

If you have a Grade III sprain or a high ankle sprain, you may need surgery to repair the ligaments. Surgery can also be an option if physical therapy and other nonsurgical treatments haven’t been effective.

Recovery Time from a Sprain

Most people who have sprained ankles recover fully with proper treatment. The recovery time for a sprain can vary depending on the severity of the injury. Grade I and II sprains usually take one to six weeks to heal. Grade III sprains can take up to twelve weeks to heal. High ankle sprains can take even longer – four to twelve months.

Can a Sprained Ankle Cause Knee Pain?

It’s possible that a sprained ankle can cause knee pain. This is because the bones, ligaments, and tendons in the ankle joint are connected to those in the knee joint through the bones, ligaments, and muscles of the lower leg. When one of these structures is injured, it can affect the others.

KeagenHadley-lady-inverting-ankles-in-dress-shoes

Knee Joint Anatomy

The knee joint is made up of three bones: the femur (thighbone), the tibia (shinbone), and the patella (kneecap). These bones are connected by ligaments, tendons, and muscles. The ligaments provide stability to the joint. The tendons connect the muscles to the bones. The muscles help move the joint.

The knee joint is also surrounded by a fluid-filled sac called the bursa. This sac helps reduce friction between the bones and ligaments in the joint.

Types of Knee Injuries from Ankle Sprains

Several types of knee injuries can occur from ankle sprains. This is due to the connection and proximity of the knee and ankle. If there is an injury at the ankle, it puts the person at a higher risk of a knee injury.

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

The most common is patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). This condition is caused by the kneecap not tracking properly in the joint. This can lead to pain and inflammation in the joint.

Iliotibial Band Syndrome

Another type of knee injury that can occur from an ankle sprain is called iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS). This condition is caused by the iliotibial band – a ligament that runs from the hip to the knee – becoming tight and irritated. This can lead to pain on the outside of the knee joint.

KeagenHadley-womans-leg-with-no-shoes

Knee Sprains

A third injury is knee sprains. These can occur when the ligaments that stabilize the knee joint are stretched or torn. This can lead to pain, swelling, and instability in the joint.

Meniscus Injuries

Ankle sprains can also cause meniscus injuries. The meniscus is a piece of cartilage that cushions the knee joint. When this cartilage is damaged, it can lead to pain and swelling in the joint. In severe cases, it can cause a meniscus tear.

Ligament Injuries

Another type of injury that can occur from ankle sprains is an injury to the knee ligaments. These can occur when the ligaments that stabilize the knee joint are stretched or torn. This can lead to pain, swelling, and instability in the joint. A commonly injured ligament is the anterior cruciate ligament.

Treating Knee Pain from an Ankle Sprain

The treatment for knee pain from an ankle sprain will depend on the type and severity of the injury. For minor injuries, rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) can be effective.

For more severe injuries, you may need to see a doctor or other healthcare provider. They can prescribe medication or refer you to physical therapy.

KeagenHadley-man-with-shoes-off

Return to Daily Activities

After you’ve recovered from your ankle sprain and knee pain, you can return to your normal activities. You may need to take it easy for a few days or weeks. But eventually, you should be able to do everything you did before the injury.

If you’re still having pain after you’ve returned to your normal activities, it’s important to see a healthcare provider. They can help you find the cause of the pain and treat it.

Conclusion

A sprained ankle is a common injury that can occur from excessive force, a direct blow, or stepping wrong. This can cause pain, swelling, and bruising in the ankle. A sprained ankle can cause knee pain. This is because the bones, ligaments, and tendons in the ankle joint are connected to those in the knee joint through the bones, ligaments, and muscles of the lower leg.

When one of these structures is injured, it can affect the others. Several types of knee injuries can occur from ankle sprains. With any of these injuries, it is important to understand the symptoms of what is occurring and to see a healthcare provider for proper treatment.

Use an ice pack or anti-inflammatory medication for swelling and pain. Physical therapy can help increase the range of motion and strength. When returning to exercise, a personal trainer can help with a safe and effective workout routine.

For a comprehensive answer on what is causing your knee pain go to a medical professional to ensure you are receiving the necessary care for your condition.

About the Author

Hi there! I’m Dr. Keagen Hadley, OTD, OTR/L. Straight out of the University of Mary, I’m all about blending my know-how in knee health, well-being, and medical technology. As a licensed occupational therapy doc, I’m here to translate complex concepts into clear, actionable insights – whether it’s knee care or groundbreaking healthcare tech.

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